Betsy’s Farm & New Faces

Betsy’s Farm

Oh, the stories we hear working at the Ranch.  Stewart, our Facilities Director (a.k.a. Do-Everything-Extraordinaire), told me about the story of Betsy’s Farm.

Welcome to Betsy's Farm at Pathfinder Ranch!

Welcome to Betsy’s Farm at Pathfinder Ranch!

 

One of our wonderful donors, Deana Brix has a mother-in-law, Betsy, who is very prim and proper and doesn’t like to get dirty.  Betsy’s Farm at Pathfinder Ranch is actually named after her.  Their family joke was to name a place where kids can get their hands dirty after a family member who doesn’t like to get her hands dirty.  And boy, do the kids like to get their hands dirty at the farm.

 

The last two weeks we have had students explore and learn about the farm and our animals. I think their favorite thing was to chase the chickens around.  Usually our farm classes get to help feed and interact with the animals, particularly the pigs and goats. What a better way to learn more about where our food comes from than to give it a little scratch behind the ears!

 

 

Our new goats are getting acquainted to their new home.

Our new goats are getting acquainted to their new home.

New Farm Faces

A gracious member of our local Garner Valley community recently donated some new goats to Pathfinder Ranch.  We’re always excited to add new faces to our farm, but these goats are a pretty unique addition.  Both of our new goats are smaller in stature than what you’d imagine for a goat.  We have a new pygmy goat and a Nigerian Dwarf goat, Miss Daisy Mae and Blue Jasmine.

 

 

Daisy Mae is curious about our photographer, and all of her recent visitors!

Daisy Mae is curious about our photographer, and all of her recent visitors!

 

Miss Daisy Mae is a Pygmy goat.  Pygmy goats originated in the Cameroon Valley of West Africa. They were imported into the United States from European zoos in the 1950s for use in zoos as well as research animals. They were eventually acquired by private breeders and quickly gained popularity as pets and exhibition animals due to their good-natured personalities, friendliness and hardy constitution. (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmy_goat)

 

 

Blue Jasmine is curious about this cottonwood tree in the middle of her new home.

Blue Jasmine is inspecting this cottonwood tree in the middle of her new home.

Blue Jasmine is a Nigerian Dwarf goat. The Nigerian Dwarf goat is a miniature dairy goat breed of West African ancestry. Originally brought to the United States on ships as food for large cats such as lions, the survivors originally lived in zoos. Nigerian Dwarf goats are popular as hobby goats due to their easy maintenance and small stature. (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigerian_Dwarf_(goat))

 

 

 

 

Both of our new goats are female adults about 5 years old, and at full size.  They are dairy goats, but we don’t plan on milking them, plus they no longer produce milk anyway.  They have already taken a liking to the students that have had the chance to visit with them.

Tune in for our next blog update where we’ll tell you about some of the exciting things going on at our garden and new hydroponics plant bed!

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